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Building confidence for all your pupils

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Planning your PSHE curriculum for next year? Schedule in some time to boost your pupils’ self-esteem

Teenagers today are under huge pressure to look good.

Anxieties over appearance can affect both boys and girls’ health, friendships and performance at school.

The UK came a worrying 12th out 13 countries surveyed in the Dove Global Beauty and Confidence Report[1], with only Japanese women and girls feeling less body confident than those in Britain, while nearly a quarter (22%) of boys admitted to doctoring images of themselves on social media to make themselves look better.

That’s why the Dove Self-Esteem Project has created a single session workshop aimed at teens, specially designed for teachers to deliver in school themselves. It is proven to have positive effects on the pupils who have taken it.

Research has shown that students who participate in the Dove Confident Me workshop experience improved self-esteem, have a more positive self-image, and feel more confident to participate in social and academic activities. [2] 

This workshop has been developed to support the school curricula[3]  in England, Scotland and Wales and is accredited by the PSHE Association.

Confident Me (single session) in-school workshop

This resource contains all you need to run a one-off body-confidence workshop in your school. It has been evaluated by the Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England. You don’t need to be an expert in body image and its suitable for teachers of any subjects to deliver.

The 45-60-minute Dove Confident Me single session workshop addresses key topics including media influence, peer pressure and strategies for promoting body image and self-esteem. Students learn through class discussion, small-group activities, videos and activity worksheets.

In this workshop students will:

  • understand the concept of appearance ideals and where pressure to achieve them comes from and how they can change throughout history
  • explore the influence of mass and social media on how young people feel about themselves.
  • discuss ways that they can feel better about themselves and resist pressures to compare themselves to unreal and unattainable and ideas of beauty.

Share this film with your students as part of the workshop. 

 

Dove: Change One Thing

The single session workshop has been evaluated by the Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England. It showed that students who participate in Dove Confident Me experience improved self-esteem, have a more positive self- image, and feel more confident to participate in social and academic activities.

Register HERE to download the workshop for free.

For parents

Download the free Uniquely Me parent guide to hand out to your pupils and parents.


This downloadable pdf contains expert advice from Dove Self-Esteem Project global experts from the fields of psychology, body image, self-esteem, eating disorders and media representation to create a resource for parents that is focused on advice and action.

Any teacher can do this >

 

[1] The Dove Global Beauty and Confidence Report conducted by Edelman Intelligence, was conducted in 13 countries between 2015 and 2016. It interviewed 6000 women aged 18-64 and 4500 aged 10-17. The countries surveyed were India, USA, UK, Brazil, China, Japan, Turkey, Canada, Germany, Russia, Mexico, South Africa and Australia.

[2] Diedrichs, PC; Atkinson, MJ; Steer, RJ; Garbett, KM; Rumsey, N & Halliwell, E (2015): Effectiveness of a brief school-based body image intervention ‘Dove Confident Me: Single Session’ when delivered by teachers and researchers: Results from a cluster randomised controlled trial.

[3] The programme has been developed to support the school curricula. In England and Wales, Key stage 3 outcomes include identifying personal strengths, recognising how personal qualities are evaluated by others, awareness of healthy eating, and media portrayal of body image. For those following the Scottish CfE 3rd level health and wellbeing programme, it covers emotional, social and physical wellbeing, planning for choices and changes, and the impact of popular culture and the media.