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Weekly Briefing: 13-20 March 2019

Netflix will introduce age classification system

The video-streaming platform Netflix is working with the UK’s official film regulator, the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), to create an algorithm which generates age classifications for its entire film and TV catalogue, according to The Telegraph. Netflix’s films and TV series will take on the familiar BBFC age classification system — ‘U’ to ‘18’.

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NCA-CEOP releases 'Jessie & Friends' online safety resources

NCA-CEOP has launched a new online video campaign called ‘Jessie & Friends’ — a series designed to teach children as young as four to stay safe online, according to the BBC. Ofcom has revealed that most three- and four-year-olds use the internet frequently and ‘Jessie & Friends’ aims to give them a positive start and equip them with key skills.

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Study finds that children are spending more time at home

A new study by researchers from the University of Warwick and Oxford University has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents. Despite concerns that device use is displacing shared family activities, such as watching TV or eating dinner, the study found no evidence of this although it pointed out that older teens spent more time alone.

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New report calls for statutory code of conduct for social media companies

The All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Social Media and Young People’s Mental Health and Wellbeing has published the first national inquiry specifically examining social media’s impact on young people’s wellbeing. The report, #NewFilters, calls for a duty of care on social media companies and a statutory code of conduct.

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TikTok used by more than 500m people

TikTok, the relatively new video-sharing platform, has amassed more than 500m users in more than 150 countries since it merged with the popular app Musical.ly late last year, according to The Guardian. It has now become the most popular short-form video platform out there, filling the gap once occupied by Twitter’s Vine.

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